Elizabeth Pepin Silva & Lewis Watts (Harlem of the West) at Bayview Opera House

Saturday Feb 29 2020   6:00 PM
Bayview Opera House  4705 3rd St, San Francisco, CA  map

Elizabeth Pepin Silva and Lewis Watts will discuss their book Harlem of the West: The San Francisco Fillmore Jazz Era at a special reception hosted by the Bayview Opera House in San Francisco.  This event will also feature a performance by The Motley Experiment.

In the 1940s and 50s, a jazz aficionado could find paradise in the nightclubs of San Francisco’s Fillmore District: Billie Holiday sang at the Champagne Supper Club; Chet Baker and Dexter Gordon jammed with the house band at Bop City; and T-Bone Walker rubbed shoulders with the locals at the bar of Texas Playhouse. The Fillmore was one of the few neighborhoods in the Bay Area where people of color could go for entertainment, and so many legendary African American musicians performed there for friends and family that the neighborhood was known as the Harlem of the West. Over a dozen clubs dotted the twenty-block-radius. Filling out the streets were restaurants, pool halls, theaters, and stores, many of them owned and run by African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Filipino Americans. The entire neighborhood was a giant multicultural party pulsing with excitement and music. In 220 lovingly restored images and oral accounts from residents and musicians, Harlem of the West captures a joyful, exciting time in San Francisco, taking readers through an all-but-forgotten multicultural neighborhood and revealing a momentous part of the country’s African American musical heritage.

Doors open at 6:00pm

Excerpt from The Motley Experiment at 7:00pm

Event runs from 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Free and Open to the Public

For more info: http://bvoh.org/calendar/ 

John Tateishi (Redress) at JCCCNC San Francisco

Saturday Mar 07 2020   3:30 PM
JCCCNC San Francisco  1840 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA  map

Join John Tateishi, in conversation with Dale Minami, at the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California in San Francisco for a pre-publication celebration and discussion of his book Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American ReparationsThis event is co-sponsored by the JACL Northern California Western Nevada Pacific District and San Francisco JACL.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

Dale Minami is an attorney with Minami and Tamaki in San Francisco. He graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from USC in 1968 and received his J.D. in 1971 from the UC Berkeley. Minami was involved in litigation involving the civil rights of Asian Pacific Americans, including Korematsu v. United States, United Philipinos for Affirmative Action v. California Blue Shield (class action employment discrimination lawsuit), Spokane JACL v. Washington State University, (class action to establish an Asian American Studies program) and Nakanishi v. UCLA (challenge to unfair tenure denial)

He also co-founded the Asian Law Caucus, the Asian American Bar Association, the Minami, Tamaki, Yamauchi Kwok and Lee Foundation and the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans (a registered PAC). He was appointed by President Clinton as Chair of the Civil Liberties Public Education Fund and sits on the Advisory Board of the California Civil Liberties Public Education Fund. Minami has served on State and Federal judicial screening committees, has taught at U.C. Berkeley and Mills College and was the Executive Producer of “Life Tastes Good”, a feature film which premiered at Sundance.

This event is free and open to the public. Donations welcome!
Purchase your copy in advance to pick up at the event for $30 (Sales tax included)

More information here at the JCCCNC events page.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing. Do not miss this opportunity to hear firsthand from individuals who worked directly to bring about some of the most notable civil rights victories for the Japanese American community! Space is limited, so please RSVP to programsevents@jcccnc.org.

Elaine Elinson (Wherever There’s A Fight) at Campbell Library

Monday Mar 09 2020   7:00 PM
Campbell Library  77 Harrison Ave, Campbell, CA  map

Elaine Elinson, author of Wherever There’s A Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California, will be at Campbell Library to discuss how freedom and equality have grown in California from the gold rush to the current post 9-11 era. She was the communications director of the ACLU in Northern California and editor of the ACLU News for more than two decades.

Ten years after the initial publication of the first-ever account of the struggle to develop and protect social justice in a bellwether state, the award-winning Wherever There’s a Fight is as relevant as ever for “navigating the slogan-riddled civil rights issues of the day” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). ACLU veterans Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi tell the sweeping story of how freedom and equality have grown in California, from the gold rush right up to the precarious post-9/11 era, despite waves of fear, bigotry, exploitation, and ignorance. The swiftly paced yet detailed narrative covers many disparate struggles for equity, but from each case a pattern emerges: whether fighting for workers’ free speech rights, protesting the Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage, asserting the right of people with disabilities, or challenging race- and ethnicity-based legislation, it is Californians themselves who transform lofty ideals into practical realities through activism and legal action. Wherever There’s a Fight paints vivid portraits of these change makers, from well-known figures like Fred Korematsu and Dolores Huerta to people who in this book finally receive the attention they deserve; and it shows how these pushes for progress have reverberated far beyond the Golden State.

For more information, see the library website.

John Tateishi (Redress) at DIESEL in Brentwood

Tuesday Mar 10 2020   6:30 PM
DIESEL, A Bookstore  225 26th St, Santa Monica, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at DIESEL in Brentwood, CA. He will be in conversation with Heyday’s executive director and publisher, Steve Wasserman.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

See DIESEL’s event site for more information.

 

Elaine Elinson (Wherever There’s a Fight) in conversation with Professor Jennifer Helton

Thursday Mar 12 2020   6:30 PM
Mechanics' Institute--4th floor meeting room  57 Post St., San Francisco, CA  map

Cosponsored by League of Women Voters SF 

In commemoration of Women’s History Month and Suffrage 100 this Mechanic’s Institute series will offer informative and inspiring presentations about the Suffrage Movement from various perspectives that led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment on August 26, 1920. 

This event features Elaine Elinson, author of the award-winning book, Wherever There’s a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California. Elaine has also written extensively about San Francisco suffragist Selina Solomons and how the vote was won in the Golden State. California was the 6th state to pass full Suffrage—or full voting rights for women in 1911—almost a decade before the 19th Amendment was passed. Elaine will be in conversation with Professor Jennifer Helton.

Professor Jennifer Helton is a historian who teaches in the California Community College system. She writes on the history of women’s suffrage and women’s rights, particularly in the nineteenth century American West.

Visit  the League of Women Voters SF at  https://lwvsf.org/home

Register Here

Questions?

Pam Troy – 415-393-0116

John Tateishi (Redress) at Book Passage Corte Madera

Wednesday Mar 18 2020   7:00 PM
Book Passage (Corte Madera)  51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at Book Passage in Corte Madera.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

See Book Passage’s event site for more information.

 

Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi (Wherever There’s a Fight) at San Luis Obispo Library

Saturday Mar 21 2020   2:00 PM
San Luis Obispo Library--Community Room  995 Palm St, San Luis Obispo, CA  map

Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi, authors of Wherever There’s a Fight, will host a program to close the Wherever There’s a Fight exhibit at the San Luis Obispo Library.  The co-curators of the exhibit and authors of the book on which it was based will lead a virtual tour of significant civil liberties sites in California, with a special focus on the central coast.  Learn about the daughter of a former slave who challenged streetcar segregation nearly 100 years before Rosa Parks, a 19th century Chinese immigrant laundry owner who fought discriminatory laws, ministers who stood up for lesbians and gay men in the 1960s, and many more unsung civil rights champions.

Ten years after the initial publication of the first-ever account of the struggle to develop and protect social justice in a bellwether state, the award-winning Wherever There’s a Fight is as relevant as ever for “navigating the slogan-riddled civil rights issues of the day” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). ACLU veterans Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi tell the sweeping story of how freedom and equality have grown in California, from the gold rush right up to the precarious post-9/11 era, despite waves of fear, bigotry, exploitation, and ignorance. The swiftly paced yet detailed narrative covers many disparate struggles for equity, but from each case a pattern emerges: whether fighting for workers’ free speech rights, protesting the Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage, asserting the right of people with disabilities, or challenging race- and ethnicity-based legislation, it is Californians themselves who transform lofty ideals into practical realities through activism and legal action. Wherever There’s a Fight paints vivid portraits of these change makers, from well-known figures like Fred Korematsu and Dolores Huerta to people who in this book finally receive the attention they deserve; and it shows how these pushes for progress have reverberated far beyond the Golden State.

 

This event will take place in the Community Room.

For more information: http://slolibrary.evanced.info/signup/Calendar

John Tateishi (Redress) at J-Sei in Emeryville

Saturday Mar 21 2020   2:00 PM
J-Sei  1285 66th St, Emeryville, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at J-Sei in Emeryville. He will be in conversation with award-winning journalist Wendy Tokuda.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

Book talk, sales, signing, and light refreshments.

RSVP requested to jill@j-sei.org, or call 510-654-4000.

See J-sei’s site for more information.

Co-presented by Berkeley JACL and J-Sei

 

Elaine Elinson (Wherever There’s A Fight) at Cupertino Library

Wednesday Mar 25 2020   7:00 PM
Cupertino Library,  10800 Torre Ave, Cupertino, CA  map

Elaine Elinson, author of Wherever There’s A Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California, will be at Los Altos Library to discuss how freedom and equality have grown in California from the gold rush to the current post 9-11 era. She was the communications director of the ACLU in Northern California and editor of the ACLU News for more than two decades.

Ten years after the initial publication of the first-ever account of the struggle to develop and protect social justice in a bellwether state, the award-winning Wherever There’s a Fight is as relevant as ever for “navigating the slogan-riddled civil rights issues of the day” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). ACLU veterans Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi tell the sweeping story of how freedom and equality have grown in California, from the gold rush right up to the precarious post-9/11 era, despite waves of fear, bigotry, exploitation, and ignorance. The swiftly paced yet detailed narrative covers many disparate struggles for equity, but from each case a pattern emerges: whether fighting for workers’ free speech rights, protesting the Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage, asserting the right of people with disabilities, or challenging race- and ethnicity-based legislation, it is Californians themselves who transform lofty ideals into practical realities through activism and legal action. Wherever There’s a Fight paints vivid portraits of these change makers, from well-known figures like Fred Korematsu and Dolores Huerta to people who in this book finally receive the attention they deserve; and it shows how these pushes for progress have reverberated far beyond the Golden State.

For more information, see the library website.

John Tateishi (Redress) at Mechanic’s Institute in San Francisco

Thursday Mar 26 2020   6:30 PM
Mechanics' Institute--4th floor meeting room  57 Post St., San Francisco, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at Mechanic’s Institute in San Francisco. He will be in conversation with Charles Wollenberg.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

Register now by visiting the Mechanic’s Institute’s event site or by calling 415-393-0101.

 

Lewis Watts (Harlem of the West) at Kaleidoscope Coffee in Point Richmond

Friday Mar 27 2020   7:00 PM
Kaleidoscope Coffee  109 Park Pl., Point Richmond, CA  map

Lewis Watts will be at Kaleidoscope Coffee to discuss his and Elizabeth Pepin Silva’s book Harlem of the West: The San Francisco Fillmore Jazz Era, newly republished by Heyday. This event is free and no registration is required.

In the 1940s and 50s, a jazz aficionado could find paradise in the nightclubs of San Francisco’s Fillmore District: Billie Holiday sang at the Champagne Supper Club; Chet Baker and Dexter Gordon jammed with the house band at Bop City; and T-Bone Walker rubbed shoulders with the locals at the bar of Texas Playhouse. The Fillmore was one of the few neighborhoods in the Bay Area where people of color could go for entertainment, and so many legendary African American musicians performed there for friends and family that the neighborhood was known as the Harlem of the West. Over a dozen clubs dotted the twenty-block-radius. Filling out the streets were restaurants, pool halls, theaters, and stores, many of them owned and run by African Americans, Japanese Americans, and Filipino Americans. The entire neighborhood was a giant multicultural party pulsing with excitement and music. In 220 lovingly restored images and oral accounts from residents and musicians, Harlem of the West captures a joyful, exciting time in San Francisco, taking readers through an all-but-forgotten multicultural neighborhood and revealing a momentous part of the country’s African American musical heritage.

 

For more information: kaleidoscopecoffee.com/events

Obi Kaufmann at the Lindsay Wildlife Experience

Saturday Mar 28 2020   6:00 PM
Lindsay Wildlife Experience  1931 1st Ave, Walnut Creek, CA  map

See California’s rivers, lakes, mountains, wildlife and more through the unique visual lens of artist, illustrator and naturalist Obi Kaufmann, author of the bestselling “The California Field Atlas,” and the recently released “The State of Water: Understanding California’s Most Precious Resource.” Kaufmann is one of Lindsay Wildlife’s Conservation Icons and will be at Lindsay 6 p.m., Saturday, March 28.

Having set aside a career as a gallery artist to capture the state’s trails, parks and wildlife in luminous watercolor, Kaufmann combines his prose and visuals in fascinating books that serve as interpretive guides to California’s precious resources. He has worked as an art critic, a tattoo artist, and creative storyteller for the Oakland-based Juniper Ridge wild craft fragrance company.

Kaufmann is one of eight speakers participating in Lindsay’s 2019-2020 Conservation Icons speaker series. Now in its third year, the series aims to educate, entertain, inspire change and foster respect for the planet we share. This event is part of the Subscription Series ticket package which can be purchased here.*

*Subscription tickets are only for the seven presentations held at Lindsay Wildlife Experience.

Books will be available for sale and signing at the event.

For more information: https://lindsaywildlife.org/events/march-2020-conservation-icons-obi-kaufmann/

Josie Iselin (The Curious World of Seaweed) at The Image Flow in Mill Valley

Saturday Mar 28 2020   11:00 AM
The Image Flow Photography Center  401 Miller Ave, Suite A, Mill Valley, CA  map

Josie Iselin (The Curious World of Seaweed) has been offering workshops in cyanotype printing with seaweed specimens for over three years. This class on creating cyanotype prints with seaweed offers a fun, easy and rewarding experience in printmaking using the cyanotype process.

The cyanotype process, also known as the blueprint process because of its deep blue color, was first introduced in the early 1800s. Anna Atkins was one of the first people to put the cyanotype process to use and in the mid-1800s became the first person to produce and photographically illustrate a book using cyanotype printing.

Josie will describe the work of Anna Atkin’s first photographically illustrated book, British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions, as well as her own work using the scanner and algae, as an introduction to the 3-hour class. Participants will also learn a bit about the seaweeds themselves and a bit of the history of their ecology.

Josie provides coated papers, loads of specimens to use in the cyanotype printing process as well as demonstrations and suggestions.

For artists and scientists, this cyanotype class is rewarding. Experimentation is encouraged, no mistakes are possible in cyanotype art!

Workshop presented by The Image Flow Photography Center, providing photography classes, custom printing services, and studio rentals.

$105.00

More information and registration here: https://theimageflow.com/photography-classes/cyanotype-prints-workshop-marin-san-francisco/

John Tateishi (Redress) at Cal State Monterey Bay

Wednesday Apr 08 2020   4:00 PM
Cal State Monterey Bay  5108 Fourth Avenue, Marina, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at Cal State Monterey Bay.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

See CSUMB’s event site for more information.

 

John Tateishi (Redress) at Skylight Books in Los Angeles

Friday Apr 10 2020   7:30 PM
Skylight Books  1818 N Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA  map

John Tateishi will be at Skylight Books in Los Angeles to discuss and sign his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

This event will take place in the store on Friday, April 10, 2020 at 7:30 PM.

For more information, see the Skylight Books event page here.

John Tateishi (Redress) at JACL in Monterey

Saturday Apr 11 2020   1:00 PM
  424 Adams St, Monterey, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at the Japanese American Citizens League in Monterey.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

 

John Tateishi (Redress) at UC Berkeley

Tuesday Apr 14 2020   6:30 PM
Ethnic Studies Library--30 Stephens Hall  UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at UC Berkeley’s Ethnic Studies Library, 30 Stephens Hall.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

 

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) in Rocklin–Book Launch Event!

Friday May 15 2020   7:00 PM
Sierra College Natural History Museum--Sewell Hall, Sierra Community College  5100 Rocklin Road, Rocklin, CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will read from and sign copies of his book at the Sierra College Natural History Museum Lecture Series in Rocklin.

Hellacious California! tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Open to the public with admission donation. For more information, visit http://www.sierracollege.edu/about-us/beyond-the-classroom/nat-hist-museum/

Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi (Wherever There’s a Fight) at California Historical Society

Tuesday May 19 2020   6:00 PM
California Historical Society  678 Mission St., San Francisco, CA  map

Join CHS and Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi, authors of Wherever There’s a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California, as they discuss and present treasures–some dating back to the first decades of California statehood–that reveal the courage of many women and men who fought for the rights we enjoy today. While writing their book, they utilized ACLU-NC archives, which are housed at the California Historical Society, and include invaluable records about Japanese American incarceration during World War II, McCarthy-era loyalty oaths, and challenges to racial segregation in housing, education and jobs. Other documents used include records of civil rights struggles that long preceded the 1934 founding of the ACLU of Northern California.

$15 General Admission, $10 for CHS Members.

For more information and registration details, see here.

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) at Auburn Rotary

Tuesday Jun 02 2020   12:00 PM
Elks Lodge  195 Pine St., Auburn, CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will read from and sign copies of his book for the Auburn Rotary Club.

Hellacious California tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Open to Auburn Rotary members only. https://auburncarotary.com/

John Tateishi (Redress) at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj)

Saturday Jun 06 2020   1:00 PM
JAMsj  535 N. Fifth St, San Jose, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at the Japanese American Museum of San Jose (JAMsj).

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

See JAMsj’s Calendar for more information.

 

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) at The Book Seller in Grass Valley

Friday Jun 12 2020   6:00 PM
The Book Seller  107 Mill Street, Grass Valley, CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will sign copies of his book for The Book Seller in Grass Valley.

Hellacious California tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Open to the public. For more information, visit The Book Seller website at www.thebookseller.biz/welcome

 

 

LAUNCH PARTY! John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren (How To Teach Nature Journaling) at Heyday’s Offices

Sunday Jun 14 2020   2:00 PM
Heyday Offices  1808 San Pablo Ave. Suite A, Berkeley, CA  map

Join us to celebrate the publication of John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren’s book, How To Teach Nature Journaling, at the Heyday offices in Berkeley! This is an open-house event. Feel free to drop in any time between 2 PM—5 PM for refreshments and a meet-and-greet with the authors.

Expanding on the philosophy and methods of The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling, John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren have developed the first-ever comprehensive book devoted to helping educators use nature journaling as an inspiring teaching tool to engage young people with wild places. In their workshops Laws and Lygren are often asked the how-tos of teaching nature journaling: how to manage student groups in the outdoors, teach drawing skills (especially from those who profess to have none), connect journaling to educational standards, and incorporate journaling into longer lessons. This book puts together curriculum plans, advice, and in-the-field experience so that educators of all stripes can leap into journaling with their students. The approaches are designed to work in a range of ecosystems and settings, and are suitable for classroom teachers, outdoor educators, camp counselors, and homeschooling parents. Full-color illustrations and sample journal pages from notable naturalists show how to put each lesson into practice. Field-tested by over a hundred educators, this book includes dozens of activities that easily support the Common Core and the Next Generation Science Standards–and, just as important, it will show kids and mentors alike how to recognize the wonder and intrigue in their midst.

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) at the South Lake Tahoe Library

Tuesday Jun 16 2020   6:00 PM
El Dorado County Library--South Lake Tahoe Branch  1000 Rufus Allen Blvd., South Lake Tahoe, CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will give a presentation and sign copies of his book for the South Lake Tahoe Friends of the Library at the South Lake Tahoe Branch of the El Dorado County Library.

Hellacious California tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Free and open to the public.  For more information, visit www.eldoradolibrary.org/

John Tateishi (Redress) at Book Passage – San Francisco Ferry Building

Wednesday Jun 17 2020   6:00 PM
Book Passage - San Francisco Ferry Building  One Ferry Building, San Francisco, CA  map

Join John Tateishi as he discusses his book, Redress: The Inside Story of the Successful Campaign for Japanese American Reparations at at Book Passage – San Francisco Ferry Building.

This is the unlikely but true story of the Japanese American Citizens League’s fight for an official government apology and compensation for the imprisonment of more than 100,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Author John Tateishi, himself the leader of the JACL Redress Committee for many years, is first to admit that the task was herculean in scale. The campaign was seeking an unprecedented admission of wrongdoing from Congress. It depended on a unified effort but began with an acutely divided community: for many, the shame of “camp” was so deep that they could not even speak of it; money was a taboo subject; the question of the value of liberty was insulting. Besides internal discord, the American public was largely unaware that there had been concentration camps on US soil, and Tateishi knew that concessions from Congress would only come with mass education about the government’s civil rights violations. Beyond the backroom politicking and verbal fisticuffs that make this book a swashbuckling read, Redress is the story of a community reckoning with what it means to be both culturally Japanese and American citizens; how to restore honor; and what duty it has to protect such harms from happening again. This book has powerful implications as the idea of reparations shapes our national conversation.

John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren (How To Teach Nature Journaling) at The Foster in Palo Alto

Saturday Jul 11 2020   7:00 PM
The Foster  940 Commercial Street, Palo Alto, CA  map

John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren present their rigorously tested, beautifully illustrated guide, How To Teach Nature Journaling at The Foster in Palo Alto on Saturday, July 11 at 7 PM.

Expanding on the philosophy and methods of The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling, John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren have developed the first-ever comprehensive book devoted to helping educators use nature journaling as an inspiring teaching tool to engage young people with wild places. In their workshops Laws and Lygren are often asked the how-tos of teaching nature journaling: how to manage student groups in the outdoors, teach drawing skills (especially from those who profess to have none), connect journaling to educational standards, and incorporate journaling into longer lessons. This book puts together curriculum plans, advice, and in-the-field experience so that educators of all stripes can leap into journaling with their students. The approaches are designed to work in a range of ecosystems and settings, and are suitable for classroom teachers, outdoor educators, camp counselors, and homeschooling parents.Full-color illustrations and sample journal pages from notable naturalists show how to put each lesson into practice. Field-tested by over a hundred educators, this book includes dozens of activities that easily support the Common Core and the Next Generation Science Standards—and, just as important, it will show kids and mentors alike how to recognize the wonder and intrigue in their midst.

For more information and registration, visit The Foster’s events page.

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) in Nevada City

Thursday Jul 16 2020   7:00 PM
The Sierra Presbyterian Church  175 Ridge Road, Nevada City , CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will sign copies of his book for the Nevada County Historical Society in Nevada City.

Hellacious California tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Free and open to the public. For more information, visit https://www.nevadacountyhistory.org/

Gary Noy (Hellacious California!) at the California State Library, Sacramento

Thursday Jul 23 2020   6:00 PM
California State Library, Room 500, Stanley Mosk Library and Courts Building  914 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, CA  map

Gary Noy, author of Hellacious California!, will give a presentation and sign copies of his book for “A Night at the State Library” at the California State Library, Sacramento.

In 1855 an ex-miner lamented that nineteenth-century California “can and does furnish the best bad things,” including “purer liquors…finer tobacco, truer guns and pistols, larger dirks and bowie knives, and prettier courtezans [sic]” than anywhere else in America. Lured by boons of gold and other exploitable resources, California’s settler population mushroomed under Mexican and early American control, and this period of rapid transformation gave rise to a freewheeling culture best epitomized by its entertainments. Hellacious California tours the rambunctious and occasionally appalling amusements of the Golden State: gambling, gun duels, knife fights, gracious dining and gluttony, prostitution, fandangos, cigars, con artistry, and the demon drink. Historian Gary Noy unearths myriad primary sources, many of which have never before been published, to spin his true tall tales that are by turns humorous and horrifying. Whether detailing the exploits of an inebriated stallion, gambling parlors as a reinforcement and subversion of racial norms, armed skirmishes over eggs, or the ins and outs of the “Spirit Lover” scam, Noy expertly situates these stories in the context of a live-for-the-moment society characterized by audacity, bigotry, and risk.

Doors open at 5 PM. Program at 6 PM. Free and open to the public.

Seating is limited.  Online reservation is required to obtain a ticket.

For more information and to RSVP, visit the California State Library at www.library.ca.gov

John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren (How to Teach Nature Journaling) at Book Passage Corte Madera

Sunday Aug 16 2020   4:00 PM
Book Passage Corte Madera  51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera, CA  map

John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren present their rigorously tested, beautifully illustrated guide, How To Teach Nature Journaling. This event will be introduced by Amy Tan, who also wrote the foreword to this book.

Expanding on the philosophy and methods of The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling, John Muir Laws and Emilie Lygren have developed the first-ever comprehensive book devoted to helping educators use nature journaling as an inspiring teaching tool to engage young people with wild places. In their workshops Laws and Lygren are often asked the how-tos of teaching nature journaling: how to manage student groups in the outdoors, teach drawing skills (especially from those who profess to have none), connect journaling to educational standards, and incorporate journaling into longer lessons. This book puts together curriculum plans, advice, and in-the-field experience so that educators of all stripes can leap into journaling with their students. The approaches are designed to work in a range of ecosystems and settings, and are suitable for classroom teachers, outdoor educators, camp counselors, and homeschooling parents.Full-color illustrations and sample journal pages from notable naturalists show how to put each lesson into practice. Field-tested by over a hundred educators, this book includes dozens of activities that easily support the Common Core and the Next Generation Science Standards—and, just as important, it will show kids and mentors alike how to recognize the wonder and intrigue in their midst.