Litquake: Heyday’s Andrew Lam, Fred Setterberg, and Howard Junker with Thaisa Frank

Sunday Oct 09 2011   12:00 PM
Variety Preview Room  582 Market St., San Francisco, CA  map

Last year’s “Off the Richter Scale” hour brought a medley of Bay Area writers whose work reveals the impact of living at the continent’s edge. This year brings even more variety and excitement. Join Thaisa Frank and three Heyday authors–Howard Junker (AutoBioDiversity), Andrew Lam (East Eats West), and Fred Setterberg (Lunch Bucket Paradise)–for “Part of Off the Richter Scale, Day Two.” The second day of “Off the Richter Scale” brings the epicenter home with two hours of writing from California and the Bay Area, before heading off to explore writing in extreme circumstances and from deep within the mind—defined in terms spiritual, physical, or cybernetic. This event is park of Litquake.

For more information visit http://www.litquake.org/calendar-of-events/event/off-the-richter-scale-day-two.

Fred SetterbergFred Setterberg is the coauthor, with Lonny Shavelson, of Toxic Nation, Under the Dragon: California’s New Culture, and five other books, including the award-winning The Roads Taken: Travels Through America’s Literary Landscapes. He has been a staff writer for the East Bay Express and editor of Travelers’ Tales America, and has written for the New York Times, The Nation, and scores of other national and regional magazines. He lives in Oakland, California. Visit his website at www.fredsetterberg.com.
Andrew LamAndrew Lam is an editor and cofounder of New America Media, an association of over two thousand ethnic media outlets in America. His essays have appeared in dozens of newspapers and magazines across the country, and his short stories are anthologized widely. Followed by a film crew back to his homeland, Vietnam, he was featured in the documentary My Journey Home, which aired nationwide on PBS in 2004. His book Perfume Dreams: Reflections on the Vietnamese Diaspora won a PEN American Beyond Margins award in 2006. Lam currently lives in San Francisco.

Photo courtesy of Andrew Lam