LITQUAKE! Using Words as Arrows: Contemporary Native American Writers

Thursday Oct 17 2013   7:30 PM
Z Space  450 Florida St., San Francisco, CA  map

Native American voices showcase the diversity of current Indian literature, from reservation humor to heartbreaking family history, in poetry, prose, and reportage. Their work spans generations and genres, illuminating the power of the cultural renaissance in which all of these incredible writers are engaged. Each author will amuse, stun, delight, inspire, and break your heart. Readers include Natalie Diaz, Joy Harjo, Gordon Lee Johnson (Fast Cars and Frybread), Deborah A. Miranda (Bad Indians), and Greg Sarris with special guest Malcolm Margolin.

$10 advance, $12 at door; for tickets and more information visit litquake.org/calendar-of-events/using-words-as-arrows-contemporary-native-american-writers.

Deborah A. MirandaDeborah A. Miranda is an enrolled member of the Ohlone Costanoan Esselen Nation of California, and is also of Chumash and Jewish ancestry. The author of two poetry collections—Indian Cartography, which won the Diane Decorah Award for First Book from the Native Writer’s Circle of the Americas, and The Zen of La Llorona, nominated for the Lambda Literary Award—she also has a collection of essays, The Hidden Stories of Isabel Meadows and Other California Indian Lacunae, forthcoming from the University of Nebraska Press. Miranda is an associate professor of English at Washington and Lee University and says reading lists for her students include as many books by “bad Indians” as possible. Visit Deborah Miranda's blog, BAD NDNS.
Gordon Lee JohnsonGordon Johnson is a Cahuilla/Cupeño from the Pala Indian Reservation in San Diego County, California. A former columnist and feature writer for the Riverside Press-Enterprise, he is the author of a book of collected columns, Rez Dogs Eat Beans, which was translated and published in the Czech Republic. He is also a contributor to the anthology of Inland Empire writers published by Heyday Books, Inlandia. Johnson lives in Pala and is working on his master of fine arts degree at Antioch University, Los Angeles.
Malcolm MargolinMalcolm Margolin is the publisher emeritus of Heyday, an independent nonprofit publisher and unique cultural institution, which he founded in 1974. Margolin is author of several books, including The Ohlone Way: Indian Life in the San Francisco–Monterey Bay Area, named by the San Francisco Chronicle as one of the hundred most important books of the twentieth century by a western writer. He has received dozens of prestigious awards among which are the Chairman's Commendation from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fred Cody Award Lifetime Achievement from the San Francisco Bay Area Book Reviewers Association, the Helen Crocker Russell Award for Community Leadership from the San Francisco Foundation, the Carey McWilliams Award for Lifetime Achievement from the California Studies Association, an Oscar Lewis Award for Western History from the Book Club of California, a Hubert Bancroft Award from Friends of the Bancroft Library, a Cultural Freedom Award from the Lannan Foundation, and a Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He helped found the Bay Nature Institute and the Alliance for California Traditional Artists.