Native Literature Showcase

Saturday Nov 09 2013   10:00 AM
California State Indian Museum  2618 K St., Sacramento, CA  map

Join us for mini-lectures and book signings with America’s Native literature greats! Authors include John O’Hagan, Clifford Trafzer, Michelle Raheja, Tony Platt (Grave Matters), Deborah Valoma and Julia Parker (Scrape the Willow until It Sings), M. Kat Anderson, and emcee Malcolm Margolin.

California State Indian Museum, 2618 K St., Sacramento, CA 95816

Free with admission to the museum; for more information download the event flyer (PDF).

Deborah ValomaDeborah Valoma is an artist, professor, and chair of the Textiles Program at California College of the Arts in Oakland and San Francisco, where her specialized field of research and teaching is textile history and theory. She earned a B.A. from UC Berkeley in anthropology and an M.F.A. in textiles from the California College of Arts and Crafts. She has written several articles on the culture of textiles as a global aesthetic practice and edited a special issue of Textiles: Journal of Cloth and Culture on the topic of dust. Formerly the Director of Fine Arts at CCA, Valoma organized the international symposium Craft Forward, in which theorists and practitioners debated future trajectories of the field. She has served on the board of directors of several community-based organizations dedicated to the preservation of traditional arts, maintains a weaving practice, and engages in ongoing collaborations with artists and choreographers.
Tony PlattTony Platt is the author of ten books and more than 150 essays and articles on race, inequality, and social justice in American history, among them Bloodlines: Recovering Hitler’s Nuremberg Laws, From Patton’s Trophy to Public Memorial, and The Child Savers: The Invention of Delinquency, which was reissued as a fortieth-anniversary edition in 2009. Platt, now a professor emeritus, taught at the University of Chicago, the University of California, Berkeley, and California State University, Sacramento, where he received awards for teaching and scholarship. He has been a visiting professor at Chuo University, Tokyo, and at Queen’s University, Belfast, and was a visiting researcher at the Huntington Library and the National Museum of American History. Platt has written for the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, Truthdig.com, the History News Network, Z Magazine, Monthly Review, and the Guardian, and his commentaries have aired on NPR. His publications have been translated into four languages. Tony Platt lives in Berkeley and Big Lagoon, California.
Malcolm MargolinMalcolm Margolin is the publisher emeritus of Heyday, an independent nonprofit publisher and unique cultural institution, which he founded in 1974. Margolin is author of several books, including The Ohlone Way: Indian Life in the San Francisco–Monterey Bay Area, named by the San Francisco Chronicle as one of the hundred most important books of the twentieth century by a western writer. He has received dozens of prestigious awards among which are the Chairman's Commendation from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Fred Cody Award Lifetime Achievement from the San Francisco Bay Area Book Reviewers Association, the Helen Crocker Russell Award for Community Leadership from the San Francisco Foundation, the Carey McWilliams Award for Lifetime Achievement from the California Studies Association, an Oscar Lewis Award for Western History from the Book Club of California, a Hubert Bancroft Award from Friends of the Bancroft Library, a Cultural Freedom Award from the Lannan Foundation, and a Distinguished Service Award from the Society of Professional Journalists. He helped found the Bay Nature Institute and the Alliance for California Traditional Artists.